Unfashionably Green

Recently I visited a Japanese museum show of Japanese fabrics. Using only natural fibers, cotton, linen and hemp, the Japanese used and re-used their fabrics, making old clothes into useful household items like quilts and thick coats and jackets. You would not be able to do the same thing with modern fabrics that shrink the first time you wash them. I’ve never been a follower of fashion and don’t think I will start now.

Druid Life

Fashion depends on the idea that we throw things away as soon as they are out of fashion and replace them with newer, trendier things. It particularly applies to clothes and accessories, but the logic of it permeates our lives – how our homes look, what’s in our kitchens, our gardens, and all the rest of it. If you can buy something, then you can buy it newer and more fashionable.

Pre-industrial revolution, fashion was mostly the concern of the wealthy. Most of us made do with what we could cobble together and kept it going for as long as it would last. Mass production introduced the idea of fashion to the population as a whole. Mass media exposes us to images of what the wealthy are doing and wearing and seeds in the rest of us the desire to have what they have, live as they live. This is…

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