Nature Walks – Break of Dawn, 5 November 17

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Nature Walks – Break of Dawn, 5 November 17

Well, it wasn’t quite dawn, just a bit afterword when I drove into the parking lot at Green Cay to see that a whole pile of people had arrived ahead of me.  Sunday.  And it’s nice to walk before the sun is high in the sky.

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It was a bit foggy around the edges this morning, with the mists lifting off the trees and shredding under the onslaught of the early morning sun.

People, birds, turtles and one gator today.

Photos:

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Enjoy the rest of your weekend!

Namasté

“Sunny” VaCoupe (aka Eliza Ayres)

© All Rights Reserved, Elizabeth Ayres Escher, http://www.bluedragonjournal.com

Photo Credits:  Taken @ Green Cay Wetlands Preserve, Palm Beach County, Florida

 

Establishing Sacred Land: Shaping A Shared Vision

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The Druid's Garden

In Tending the Wild, a book that has deeply shaped my thinking about humans, nature and relationship, M. Kat Anderson reports in her introduction that the concept of “wilderness” had a very different understanding to the native peoples of California.  To the native peoples, “wilderness” was a negative thing; it was land that was essentially “untended” and left on its own. Native peoples saw tending the land–scattering seeds, selective burning, cultivating various kinds of perennial and annual spaces–as necessary for the health and growth of the land.  And the abundance that is reported by early western visitors to California and all of what is now known as North America certainly supported that fact: the land was incredibly rich, diverse, and abundant.

Of course, today, we see “wilderness” as a good thing. It is something that humans haven’t touched, it remains pristine and unbroken. In the post-industrial western…

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