Journal Entry 04.13.2017 – Morikami Japanese Gardens & Wakodahatchee Wetlands

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Journal Entry 04.13.2017 – Morikami Japanese Gardens & Wakodahatchee Wetlands Outing

Yesterday was a rainy today; today was blue skies filled with huge puffy white clouds — time to go sight-seeing, again.  This time I was heading a little south along Jog Road to Morikami Japanese Gardens & Museum.  Later, I decided to stop at Wakodahatchee Wetlands on the way back.  Altogether, these two wonderful and very different places provided a feast for photo-taking!

The Japanese Gardens are beautiful and extensive.  I’ve been to Japanese Gardens in San Francisco, Portland and Seattle.  This garden was larger and more diversified than the others that I’ve seen as it was divided into six different gardens from different time periods and traditions of Japan.  It was a place of serenity, beauty and grace… and filled with a lot of people.  I’ll let some of my photos do the talking for me…

BTW, the gardens charge admission.  There is ample parking, a museum, restaurant, store and ongoing educational programs and festivals.

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And then a little Wakodahatchee Wetlands and its amazing assortment of nesting birds and alligators!

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This amazing place is designed to be a natural gray water filtering area!  There are alligators, nesting birds — including the largest gatherings of Wood Storks I’ve seen in Florida and the unusual Anhinga, which swims underwater to fish.  It’s definitely a place that should be on your list when visiting Palm Beach County.  Admission is free.

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The Japanese gardens had periodic watering stations and benches.  It is rather hot to walk through the open areas, but the breezes were pleasant today.  The wetlands trail is entirely on elevated boardwalk.  The trails in each park are about a mile long, but allow plenty of time to gawk at the scenery, flora and fauna.  An intriguing difference in the Japanese gardens was the usage of vegetation either native to or adapted to the hot, humid South Florida climate.  Yet, the moment I started on the path, I knew I was in a well-planned, sensitively laid-out and beautifully maintained garden.  Wonderful!

Hope you enjoyed this short tour.  I’ll be posting more photos as attachments to some of my blogs in the future.

Enjoy your upcoming weekend!

Eliza Ayres

All Rights Reserved, 2017, Elizabeth Ayres Escher, http://www.bluedragonjournal.com